Monday, October 31, 2011

Continental Breakfast
8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
Welcome and Keynote: New Directions in Taxonomy
9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Don Turnbull, InfoTheory, LLC
The growth of the semantic web and social applications based upon shared descriptions of content are bringing new directions for ontology and taxonomy building. The possibilities for personal taxonomies based upon user behavior and actions open up exciting vistas in the use of both formal and informal vocabularies, and may cause us to rethink our traditional approaches to designing taxonomies and ontologies. Turnbull explores this emerging world through examples of how organizations are taking advantage of these changes to meet their objectives.

Taxonomy Is Only the Beginning: Five Growth Drivers You May Have Missed
10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Gina Bulatovic, Director of Professional Services, ByteManagers, Inc.
Gina highlights the five drivers often missed and upon which the ecommerce experience rely: data normalization, data population, search optimization, imaging/visual browse and dynamic content. With content properly modeled, data elements can be harmonized for the customer, whether the consumer or internal user.

Coffee Break
10:15 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Getting Started Track
Deal the Cards! Successful Beginnings for Taxonomies
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Marjorie M.K. Hlava, President & Chairman, Access Innovations, Inc. Data Harmony My blog is TaxoDiary.com
This learn-by-doing session starts by building a solid conceptual foundation for taxonomy creation and reinforces concepts with audience participation. We establish the rules of the game by drawing on taxonomy standards for the key components of a thesaurus, and explore how those elements support information needs of users from multiple perspectives. Examining illustrative sites and behind-the-scenes solutions, you'll see a well constructed taxonomy with a rich interplay of terms and synonyms lead to better information access. Then we turn to developing a taxonomy that suits your needs and serves users, respecting their angles on specialized vocabularies. We'll jump into the game using a card sort activity for insight into how a subject area can be viewed, described, and structured. Join the learning and fun!

Keynote Luncheon: Semantic Technology: Why?
12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Jeremy Bentley, CEO & Founder, Smartlogic, USA
Semantic systems are coming of age, and semantic technologies are being adopted and put to work. But what type of problems are they good at solving? Using case studies from government and enterprise deployments, Jeremy Bentley shares practical lessons learned on how semantic systems are applied to information that is both behind the corporate firewall as well as on the web. He discusses how the benefits of adding semantics to an organization’s existing investment in search and content management are impressive, illustrates the impact of semantic technology on an organization’s information architecture, and looks at the difference between semantic projects for the enterprise and the goal of Web 3.0 (aka the semantic web), the likely path of convergence, as well as the deliverables and value that each step should provide. Bentley concludes with some do’s and don’ts of semantic projects as well as the role of the information professional in such a project.

The Curious Lives of Full-Time Taxonomists
1:15 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Zachary R Wahl, CEO, Enterprise Knowledge
Edee Edwards, Ontology Architect, National Fire Protection Association
Farah Gheriss, Group Leader, Information Organization and Access Group, International Monetary Fund
Nikkia Anderson, Senior Information Specialist, Information International Associates, Inc.
This candid look at three different professional lives builds on a tradition of taking an in-depth first-person dive into the responsibilities, challenges, and opportunities for people who work as full-time taxonomists within large organizations. What are the different challenges they face selling the value of taxonomy? What issues surround software and vendor selection, and how much input do vendors have? This panel talks about how they got their start within their organization, a “typical” work week, and gives examples of recent projects and initiatives. They engage the audience in the discussion and face the perceptions and misconceptions we have about practicing taxonomists.

Tips and Tricks From a Novice Taxonomy Specialist
2:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Sergio Orefice, Taxonomy Specialist, PricewaterhouseCoopers
For an individual who is new to the world of librarianship, “taxonomy” can be a daunting field to understand. These fears can be conquered with a little preparation and a lot of patience. This session provides a list of tips and recounts some of the obstacles encountered during the speaker’s transition from the PwC Finance department to Vocabulary Management. Sergio Orefice shares some experiences that have made him a better taxonomy specialist, including understanding what the taxonomy world in a corporate setting is really like, to courses an individual should take to prepare for the task ahead — all the tips and tricks he wished he’d had before becoming a taxonomy specialist.

Embracing the Unexpected in Taxonomy Development
2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Seth Maislin, Principal Consultant, Digital Transformation, Earley Information Science
Surprise is the best validation. Taxonomy developers can’t know what they don’t know, and all taxonomies and taxonomy applications are unique in some way, with their own nuances and custom contexts. It’s important for taxonomists to uncover these details quickly, and this means the unanticipated is business as usual. Besides, surprise is far more useful than general agreement among stakeholders, which often suffers from siloed thinking and political motivations. Seth Maislin shares several real-life, on-the-job surprises (and a few laughs), along with suggestions on how to find surprises of your own.

Coffee Break
3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
How to Build a Corporate Taxonomy
3:15 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Gretta A Chahine, Corporate Taxonomist and Enterprise Portal & Search Leader, Global Information Services, Caterpillar
Taxonomy is a fundamental part of any information architecture. Any organization which needs to make significant volumes of information available in an efficient and consistent way to its customers, partners, or employees needs to understand the value of a serious approach to taxonomy design and management. This session focuses on the process and techniques to develop an enterprisewide taxonomy strategy, organize your data, and improve your search relevancy.

Successfully Advocating for Taxonomy in the Corporate World
3:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Fleur Levitz, Taxonomy Lead (VP), JP Morgan Chase
As the word “taxonomy” is becoming more recognized and widespread, there is still a lot of confusion and misinformation about the benefits of a taxonomic approach to structuring content or data in the business world. There is very often resistance from senior management, who hesitate to spend precious budget on cost-saving measures, as well as pushback from established teams who have not yet bought into the methodology. Fleur Levitz shares practical advice with taxonomists looking to break into the corporate world, including strategies on communicating ROI to senior management, getting buy-in and establishing credibility with cross-disciplinary teams, as well as developing business-specific skills to broaden your impact beyond traditional taxonomy work.

Semantic Ontologies in Your Enterprise
4:15 p.m. - 4:55 p.m.
Dave McComb, President, Semantic Arts, Inc.
Hundreds of major corporations such as Boeing, NASA, and TVA already employ semantic-based technologies to directly improve the effectiveness of their information systems. Between 35% and 65% of the $300 billion being spent per year on systems integration is attributable to resolving semantic mismatches between systems. Almost all of our newest promising technologies such as web services, XML, business rules, and business intelligence depend on semantics for the success of their implementation. Dave McComb covers three case studies that show how ontologies have been used as the basis for SOA modeling, cross domain searches and semantic wiki and the use of ontologies to support large scale entity extraction.

Everyone Regroups for a Standards Update
5:00 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Marjorie M.K. Hlava, President & Chairman, Access Innovations, Inc. Data Harmony My blog is TaxoDiary.com
Marjorie highlights the current state of standards, including SKOS, OWL, and others, as well as their implications for those working on taxonomies, ontologies, or folksonomies.

Welcome Reception
6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Join us for drinks and hors d'oeuvres in a relaxed atmosphere. Continue the day's discussions with new colleagues, meet and talk with conference speakers and sponsors, or unwind with old friends after an insightful day of sessions.

Beyond the Basics Track
Taxonomy Alignment: EU Publications Office
10:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
Laurent Begin, Senior Consultant, Mondeca
The Publications Office of the European Union launched several initiatives to leverage the Office’s controlled vocabularies and indexing tools to facilitate metadata interoperability and access to multilingual government content. One initiative, a taxonomy alignment, aims to improve automatic indexing and re-indexing of existing content, support automatic query expansion, and ultimately, help the Publication Office to join the “Linked Data” community. It uses advanced semantic technologies and is specifically powered by AROMA, INRIA Exmo’s ontology matcher. This talk explains why and how the EU relies on taxonomy alignment to achieve its objectives and covers: the technology behind semantic ontology matching, examples of alignment between various taxonomies and thesauri, manual quality control, and validation of matching relations based on scores.

Rebuilding Taxonomy Warehouse as an Ontology
10:50 a.m. - 11:10 a.m.
Dave Clarke, CEO, Synaptica LLC, USA
With more than 3.5 million hits, Taxonomy Warehouse is a popular online resource for people researching information about taxonomies. This year the site is being completely rebuilt as an online ontology. This case study reviews the data modeling and design process required to convert a directory database into an ontology. It examines facet analysis and the definition of attributes and semantic relationships. While discussing the challenges and rewards of the conversion exercise, the session compares the before and after versions of the website, explores the boundary between taxonomy management systems and content management systems, and discusses the idea that as taxonomies evolve into ontologies, they become not merely a means to access information, but information in their own right.

Taxonomy Design for Open Source Digital Asset Management Systems
11:10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Michael Lauruhn, Disruptive Technologies Director, Elsevier Labs
Joseph A. Busch, Founder and Principal, Taxonomy Strategies
The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Pharmacy’s Communications and Planning Unit has established and is maintaining a web-based digital asset collection. These digital assets are used by the school for web story illustrations, media requests, publications, announcements, and presentations. This session reports on the design and implementation of the metadata scheme for the open source digital assets repository. The scheme needed to include asset metadata about the objects, as well as controlled vocabularies and keywords to describe and categorize them. The taxonomy development process identified image-specific fields that describe the visual image content, going beyond the literal “who, what, where,” to attributes such as number of people, types of scenes, and others that could be considered a more abstract representation of the visual content. The digital assets taxonomy has served the repository very well, meeting the goals to enhance searching for assets and making them easier to manage.

Bank for International Settlements Document Management Strategy Taxonomy
11:30 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.
Dorothea Jama-Auerswald, Senior Business Analyst, Bank for International Settlements
Joseph A. Busch, Founder and Principal, Taxonomy Strategies
The Bank for International Settlements (BIS) is an organization of central banks that seeks to make monetary policy more predictable and transparent among its members. As part of the process of reviewing its document management processes, the BIS worked with functional area stakeholders to consider how documents might better be categorized so that categorizing, finding, and archiving documents would be easy and efficient. It developed a practical document categorization strategy to implement in the document management application environment and to maintain it over time. This session discusses the BIS taxonomy strategy and key features, such as making ad hoc categorizations in document titles to group related documents an explicit part of the taxonomy, making large complex taxonomies of activities and content discrete and concise, and mapping existing categories to the new scheme to facilitate content migration.

Keynote Luncheon: Semantic Technology: Why?
12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Jeremy Bentley, CEO & Founder, Smartlogic, USA
Semantic systems are coming of age, and semantic technologies are being adopted and put to work. But what type of problems are they good at solving? Using case studies from government and enterprise deployments, Jeremy Bentley shares practical lessons learned on how semantic systems are applied to information that is both behind the corporate firewall as well as on the web. He discusses how the benefits of adding semantics to an organization’s existing investment in search and content management are impressive, illustrates the impact of semantic technology on an organization’s information architecture, and looks at the difference between semantic projects for the enterprise and the goal of Web 3.0 (aka the semantic web), the likely path of convergence, as well as the deliverables and value that each step should provide. Bentley concludes with some do’s and don’ts of semantic projects as well as the role of the information professional in such a project.

Taxonomies & Ontologies for Content Management and Search
1:15 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Dean Allemang, Chief Scientist, TopQuadrant Inc. & Co-Author, Semantic Web for the Working Ontologist
Anthony J Rhem, CEO/Principal Consultant, A. J. Rhem & Associates Author, Knowledge Management in Practice
These two presentations focus on the design, implementation and deployment of taxonomies and ontologies for content man agement and search. Anthony Rhem begins by looking at how several organizations use taxonomies and ontologies to improve unstructured content search and retrieval and meet the busi ness expectations of the KM solution. Dean Allemang examines common barriers to getting taxonomies out of the desktop tools and into enterprise use. He draws on experiences with severa enterprises in applying taxonomies to content management.

"Build vs. Buy" & Standards-Based Taxonomy Management
2:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Bob DuCharme, Technical Writer, Commonwealth Computer Research, Inc.
When implementing a taxonomy management solution, the disadvantages of both custom systems and full-featured vendor solutions can be mitigated by using standards-based software. Software libraries and services with web-based interfaces that support open standards can provide building blocks that enable quicker assembly, implementation, and rollout of a custom solution. DuCharme reviews standards such as ANSI Z39.19, XML, SKOS, and ISO 25964 as well as standards-based free and commercial tools to consider.

Hierarchies & Polyhierarchies: Is More Better?
2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Sherry Chang, Technical Lead, Intel
Heather Hedden, Data and Knowledge Engineer, Author, The Accidental Taxonomist, Semantic Web Company
There are differences of opinion regarding the implementation of what is called a “polyhierarchy.” Looking at case study examples, Heather Hedden considers where polyhierarchies are beneficial and where they result in needless complication, identifying the fine line between too much and not enough. Sherry Chang examines how Intel used taxonomy software to manage multiple hierarchical pathways with a common base of terminology. She shares Intel’s strategy of a unified terminology base while allowing different business groups to build different hierarchies using a common term set, lessons learned regarding standards conflicts, building business rules for a new class of hierarchical behavior, and the development of multiple parallel hierarchies.

Coffee Break
3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Avoiding the Autobiographical Taxonomy
3:15 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Gary Carlson, Principal Taxonomist, Factor
Taxonomies are an explicit description of an organization’s goals and world view. However, they all too often end up exposing the biases or views of a small group within the organization. Gary Carlson dissects real-world taxonomies and navigation schemes to see what they tell us about the organization or taxonomists that built them. He discusses the role of web analytics, market research, user research, personas, and other sources that can be utilized in guiding the development of a truly business-focused taxonomy.

Enabling Social Media Through Metadata
3:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Christian Buckley, Director, Product Evangelism, Axceler
Many companies, whether considering further investment in their SharePoint 2007 deployments or planning upgrades to SharePoint 2010, are reviewing their social media strategies. Users are chomping at the bit to deploy and use the new, natively supported social media features in SharePoint 2010. But most administrators do not fully understand the taxonomy and data governance issues within SharePoint that are associated with these kinds of solutions. Christian Buckley walks participants through the taxonomy and governance implications of the social media capabilities within SharePoint 2007 and 2010. He provides information to prepare organizations for these tools, as well as examples on how to approach setting up and managing metadata, aligning these tools with their broader corporate content management strategies, and maintaining manageability of a SharePoint environment through governance.

Empirical Approaches to Taxonomy Development
4:15 p.m. - 4:55 p.m.
Patrick Lambe, Principal Consultant, Straits Knowledge, Singapore
The history of taxonomy development has its roots in theoryinformed, practice-based approaches, often dependent on the knowledge and resources of subject matter experts to inform the choice and arrangement of terms and concepts. The nature of taxonomy work has shifted with the rise of digital content, requiring a deeper understanding of the different user communities and a need to represent their information landscapes in ways that they recognize. The body of knowledge in this area is now at a stage where it is possible to begin exploring empirical approaches to taxonomy development that are less reliant on individual perspective and more grounded in the actual use of the terminology in context. Examples of effective empirical approaches illustrate techniques and tools that are now available for the taxonomy developer faced with a new project.

Everyone Regroups for a Standards Update
5:00 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Marjorie M.K. Hlava, President & Chairman, Access Innovations, Inc. Data Harmony My blog is TaxoDiary.com
Marjorie highlights the current state of standards, including SKOS, OWL, and others, as well as their implications for those working on taxonomies, ontologies, or folksonomies.

Welcome Reception
6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Join us for drinks and hors d'oeuvres in a relaxed atmosphere. Continue the day's discussions with new colleagues, meet and talk with conference speakers and sponsors, or unwind with old friends after an insightful day of sessions.